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I use to see the Candy Man T around SO. Cal. a lot, wonder what happened to it?
I use to see the Candy Man T around SO. Cal. a lot, wonder what happened to it?
Dave,
It sold for I think for 40,000. at Mecem.
  • Jim Molino's The Candy Man Roadster
  • 1977 America's Most Beautiful Roadster award winner
  • 1977 ISCA National Points Champion
  • One of Andy Brizio's Instant T cars
  • Originally owned by Miles Foster and displayed at the Oakland Roadster Show in 1969
  • This was the first Brizio front-engined car with a torsion bar front end and Corvette independent rear suspension
  • Purchased by Bill Roach after the Roadster Show in 1970 and driven from the San Francisco bay are to Memphis for the Street Rod Nationals in 1971
  • Featured in September 1972 Rod Action and 1974 Rod and Custom magazines
  • The car went through a couple owners and show appearances before being purchased in 1975 by Jim Molino
  • The car was rebuilt and he commissioned Art Himsl and Mike Haas to paint the car Candy Red with a Candy Man moniker on the door for the 1976 show season
  • For 1977, Molino decided to take the car to another level
  • Painted Pearl Yellow by Mike Farley and Bobby Martinez
  • Kenny Foster updated the interior
  • Supercharged 350 CI V-8 engine
  • Custom engraving on engine components and shifter housing
  • Chromed front and rear independent suspension
  • Featured on the cover of Popular Hot Rodding and ISCA Show Stopper in 1978
  • Later purchased by Lee Gunther and then Arnold Link
  • Purchased by Black Gejeian in 2004
  • VIN ANNOUNCEMENT
  • Jim Molino's The Candy Man Roadster
  • 1977 America's Most Beautiful Roadster award winner
  • 1977 ISCA National Points Champion
  • One of Andy Brizio's Instant T cars
  • Originally owned by Miles Foster and displayed at the Oakland Roadster Show in 1969
  • This was the first Brizio front-engined car with a torsion bar front end and Corvette independent rear suspension
  • Purchased by Bill Roach after the Roadster Show in 1970 and driven from the San Francisco bay are to Memphis for the Street Rod Nationals in 1971
  • Featured in September 1972 Rod Action and 1974 Rod and Custom magazines
  • The car went through a couple owners and show appearances before being purchased in 1975 by Jim Molino
  • The car was rebuilt and he commissioned Art Himsl and Mike Haas to paint the car Candy Red with a Candy Man moniker on the door for the 1976 show season
  • For 1977, Molino decided to take the car to another level
  • Painted Pearl Yellow by Mike Farley and Bobby Martinez
  • Kenny Foster updated the interior
  • Supercharged 350 CI V-8 engine
  • Custom engraving on engine components and shifter housing
  • Chromed front and rear independent suspension
  • Featured on the cover of Popular Hot Rodding and ISCA Show Stopper in 1978
  • Later purchased by Lee Gunther and then Arnold Link
  • Purchased by Black Gejeian in 2004
  • VIN ANNOUNCEMENT
As is the custom with many show cars that have survived generations, multiple ownerships, trophies and varying iterations, none have become an icon of such variants on the Street Rod theme as The Candy Man. This 1923 Ford Model T Roadster is actually one of Andy Brizio’s original “Instant T” fiberglass bodies, built as a competition show car in time for the 1969 Oakland Roadster Show. Miles Foster commissioned Brizio’s shop to build the car, and Brizio incorporated a series of firsts in its build: the first front-engine Brizio Street Rod to feature a custom torsion bar front-end suspension setup, the first of his cars to feature an independent rear-end suspension from a Corvette and the first Brizio Street Rod to be built without a truck bed or trunk, simply featuring a large, spun aluminum keg-style Moon fuel tank behind the cab. Miles Foster also commissioned engine-builder Cub Barnett to build the 4-71 blown Chevrolet small-block V-8, Kenny Foster to do design and stitch the interior upholstery, and famed San Francisco Bay Area custom painter Art Himsl to design the car’s graphics and paint scheme. After a few car show seasons, Miles Foster sold the roadster to Bill Roach, who also had car show competition aspirations. Roach wasn’t a fan of the signature psychedelic Himsl paint, so he took the car back to Himsl again for a solid gold paint scheme featuring orange flames. He also returned to Kenny Foster for a custom-upholstered roadster top and added a set of fenders and a custom hood scoop for a new look and attitude befitting the early 1970s. Roach named the car the “Budget Mobile” as a nod to the rental car business he owned and had the name painted across its cowl. Between roughly 1972 and 1976, the car changed hands at least three times before it was sold to Jim Molino of Pleasant Hill, California. It had appeared in photos of the Oakland Roadster Show in 1974 and 1975, and Molino had intentions to carry on the tradition. Molino added a truck bed to the cab, and then returned to Art Himsl once more for a Candy Red paint job before Himsl’s wife, Ellen, added a candy man illustration to its doors. Kenny Foster’s upholstery shop also saw the car again, this time changing the roadster top to a triple porthole rear window design with a triangular window in the roof. Renamed “The Candy Man,” it was campaigned across the 1976 show car season before Molino began to reimagine the car once more for a run at a few ISCA trophies. He tasked race car chassis builder Chuck Delu to build a new chassis, tapped Bobby Martinez and Mike Farley to change the paint to the pearl yellow and graphics scheme it wears to this day, and commissioned Rudy Peña to engrave nearly every metal surface forward of the body. The Candy Man won the America’s Most Beautiful Roadster award at the 1977 Oakland Roadster Show, as well as the ISCA points championship the same year. The car changed hands a few more times before it ended up in Arnold Link’s Northern California garage in 1979, where it was stored until he decided to sell it in 2003. Blackie Gejeian bought The Candy Man in early 2004, just in time to display it at the annual Detroit Autorama that year. Gejeian attested to the fact that the car has not been changed since winning the 1977 AMBR and ISCA points race.
1977 AMBR WINNER JIM MOLINO'S CANDY MAN  (9).jpg
 

Tom

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Staff member
Dave,
It sold for I think for 40,000. at Mecem.
  • Jim Molino's The Candy Man Roadster
  • 1977 America's Most Beautiful Roadster award winner
  • 1977 ISCA National Points Champion
  • One of Andy Brizio's Instant T cars
  • Originally owned by Miles Foster and displayed at the Oakland Roadster Show in 1969
  • This was the first Brizio front-engined car with a torsion bar front end and Corvette independent rear suspension
  • Purchased by Bill Roach after the Roadster Show in 1970 and driven from the San Francisco bay are to Memphis for the Street Rod Nationals in 1971
  • Featured in September 1972 Rod Action and 1974 Rod and Custom magazines
  • The car went through a couple owners and show appearances before being purchased in 1975 by Jim Molino
  • The car was rebuilt and he commissioned Art Himsl and Mike Haas to paint the car Candy Red with a Candy Man moniker on the door for the 1976 show season
  • For 1977, Molino decided to take the car to another level
  • Painted Pearl Yellow by Mike Farley and Bobby Martinez
  • Kenny Foster updated the interior
  • Supercharged 350 CI V-8 engine
  • Custom engraving on engine components and shifter housing
  • Chromed front and rear independent suspension
  • Featured on the cover of Popular Hot Rodding and ISCA Show Stopper in 1978
  • Later purchased by Lee Gunther and then Arnold Link
  • Purchased by Black Gejeian in 2004
  • VIN ANNOUNCEMENT

  • Jim Molino's The Candy Man Roadster
  • 1977 America's Most Beautiful Roadster award winner
  • 1977 ISCA National Points Champion
  • One of Andy Brizio's Instant T cars
  • Originally owned by Miles Foster and displayed at the Oakland Roadster Show in 1969
  • This was the first Brizio front-engined car with a torsion bar front end and Corvette independent rear suspension
  • Purchased by Bill Roach after the Roadster Show in 1970 and driven from the San Francisco bay are to Memphis for the Street Rod Nationals in 1971
  • Featured in September 1972 Rod Action and 1974 Rod and Custom magazines
  • The car went through a couple owners and show appearances before being purchased in 1975 by Jim Molino
  • The car was rebuilt and he commissioned Art Himsl and Mike Haas to paint the car Candy Red with a Candy Man moniker on the door for the 1976 show season
  • For 1977, Molino decided to take the car to another level
  • Painted Pearl Yellow by Mike Farley and Bobby Martinez
  • Kenny Foster updated the interior
  • Supercharged 350 CI V-8 engine
  • Custom engraving on engine components and shifter housing
  • Chromed front and rear independent suspension
  • Featured on the cover of Popular Hot Rodding and ISCA Show Stopper in 1978
  • Later purchased by Lee Gunther and then Arnold Link
  • Purchased by Black Gejeian in 2004
  • VIN ANNOUNCEMENT
As is the custom with many show cars that have survived generations, multiple ownerships, trophies and varying iterations, none have become an icon of such variants on the Street Rod theme as The Candy Man. This 1923 Ford Model T Roadster is actually one of Andy Brizio’s original “Instant T” fiberglass bodies, built as a competition show car in time for the 1969 Oakland Roadster Show. Miles Foster commissioned Brizio’s shop to build the car, and Brizio incorporated a series of firsts in its build: the first front-engine Brizio Street Rod to feature a custom torsion bar front-end suspension setup, the first of his cars to feature an independent rear-end suspension from a Corvette and the first Brizio Street Rod to be built without a truck bed or trunk, simply featuring a large, spun aluminum keg-style Moon fuel tank behind the cab. Miles Foster also commissioned engine-builder Cub Barnett to build the 4-71 blown Chevrolet small-block V-8, Kenny Foster to do design and stitch the interior upholstery, and famed San Francisco Bay Area custom painter Art Himsl to design the car’s graphics and paint scheme. After a few car show seasons, Miles Foster sold the roadster to Bill Roach, who also had car show competition aspirations. Roach wasn’t a fan of the signature psychedelic Himsl paint, so he took the car back to Himsl again for a solid gold paint scheme featuring orange flames. He also returned to Kenny Foster for a custom-upholstered roadster top and added a set of fenders and a custom hood scoop for a new look and attitude befitting the early 1970s. Roach named the car the “Budget Mobile” as a nod to the rental car business he owned and had the name painted across its cowl. Between roughly 1972 and 1976, the car changed hands at least three times before it was sold to Jim Molino of Pleasant Hill, California. It had appeared in photos of the Oakland Roadster Show in 1974 and 1975, and Molino had intentions to carry on the tradition. Molino added a truck bed to the cab, and then returned to Art Himsl once more for a Candy Red paint job before Himsl’s wife, Ellen, added a candy man illustration to its doors. Kenny Foster’s upholstery shop also saw the car again, this time changing the roadster top to a triple porthole rear window design with a triangular window in the roof. Renamed “The Candy Man,” it was campaigned across the 1976 show car season before Molino began to reimagine the car once more for a run at a few ISCA trophies. He tasked race car chassis builder Chuck Delu to build a new chassis, tapped Bobby Martinez and Mike Farley to change the paint to the pearl yellow and graphics scheme it wears to this day, and commissioned Rudy Peña to engrave nearly every metal surface forward of the body. The Candy Man won the America’s Most Beautiful Roadster award at the 1977 Oakland Roadster Show, as well as the ISCA points championship the same year. The car changed hands a few more times before it ended up in Arnold Link’s Northern California garage in 1979, where it was stored until he decided to sell it in 2003. Blackie Gejeian bought The Candy Man in early 2004, just in time to display it at the annual Detroit Autorama that year. Gejeian attested to the fact that the car has not been changed since winning the 1977 AMBR and ISCA points race.
View attachment 80968
Wow, an AMBR-winning car selling for only $40k. I am dumbfounded.
 
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