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SHOE BOXES

#15
1951 Ford Victoria restyled by Joe Bailon of Bailon's Custom Shop for Joe Tocchini of Hayward, California in 1958. Bailon and Tocchini spent endless of hours figuring out how the design would look like before any metal were cut. Starting at the front, the fenders were flared horizontally and modified with 1958 Chrysler Imperial quad headlights. A new rectangular grille shell was shaped and fitted with a 1957 Buick grille which was frenched into the grille cavity. Due to the modifications to the fenders, the hood had to be reshaped. It was shortened and narrowed. A scoop filled with five chrome teeth was recessed in the hood with a wide recess leading down to the grille. The front bumper was discarded, and swapped with custom made Nerf bars which featured directional lights. All wheel opening were reshaped and radiused. Bailon was well known for his artistic interpretations of lakes pipes, The Mystery Ford was no exception. The lakes pipes went through the front fenders and continued through the built-out rocker panels. Chromed gear cogs were mounted on the pipes. Cadillac side trim was molded to the doors to brake down the slab-sided sheetmetal. The squared-off theme was carried through the rear beginning at the radiused wheel openings leading into the horizontal flares above the quad 1956 Oldsmobile taillights, and ending into the rolled center pan. A 1955 Pontiac grille with its split bumper was frenched to the rear end. The deck lid opening was narrowed at the bottom due to the radical modifications. Once the bodywork was done, it was painted in Bailon's trademark color, Candy Apple tangerine red and white pearl. The chromed reversed were fit with 1950 Ford hubcaps featuring accessory bullets and blades to highlight the modifications. The interior was done in white Naugahyde with nylon frieze. The only large piece of factory sheetmetal on the car that was left over the makeover, was the stock Victoria hardtop roof, the only giveaway of the car's identity. Bailon wrapped up the style with dual spotlights and Bailon crests on the rood pillars.

February 15-23, 1958, The Mystery was shown at the ninth annual National Roadster Show in Oakland where it won the Custom Car D'Elegance award. Due to excellent craftsmanship, both the Mystery and Bill Carr's 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air, The Aztec, won the Custom Car D'Elegance that year.

The Mystery went through several changes and paint jobs. When it was shown at the National Roadster Show in February 1958 it was copper, orange and gold. A picture taken by Andy Southard in 1963 shows the car in white and red. Another picture from the 1960s shows the car with a red and silver paint job.

From Custom Rooder.
 Joe Tocchini's 1951 Ford (1).jpg
 Joe Tocchini's 1951 Ford (2).jpg
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#20
1951 Ford Victoria restyled by Joe Bailon of Bailon's Custom Shop for Joe Tocchini of Hayward, California in 1958. Bailon and Tocchini spent endless of hours figuring out how the design would look like before any metal were cut. Starting at the front, the fenders were flared horizontally and modified with 1958 Chrysler Imperial quad headlights. A new rectangular grille shell was shaped and fitted with a 1957 Buick grille which was frenched into the grille cavity. Due to the modifications to the fenders, the hood had to be reshaped. It was shortened and narrowed. A scoop filled with five chrome teeth was recessed in the hood with a wide recess leading down to the grille. The front bumper was discarded, and swapped with custom made Nerf bars which featured directional lights. All wheel opening were reshaped and radiused. Bailon was well known for his artistic interpretations of lakes pipes, The Mystery Ford was no exception. The lakes pipes went through the front fenders and continued through the built-out rocker panels. Chromed gear cogs were mounted on the pipes. Cadillac side trim was molded to the doors to brake down the slab-sided sheetmetal. The squared-off theme was carried through the rear beginning at the radiused wheel openings leading into the horizontal flares above the quad 1956 Oldsmobile taillights, and ending into the rolled center pan. A 1955 Pontiac grille with its split bumper was frenched to the rear end. The deck lid opening was narrowed at the bottom due to the radical modifications. Once the bodywork was done, it was painted in Bailon's trademark color, Candy Apple tangerine red and white pearl. The chromed reversed were fit with 1950 Ford hubcaps featuring accessory bullets and blades to highlight the modifications. The interior was done in white Naugahyde with nylon frieze. The only large piece of factory sheetmetal on the car that was left over the makeover, was the stock Victoria hardtop roof, the only giveaway of the car's identity. Bailon wrapped up the style with dual spotlights and Bailon crests on the rood pillars.

February 15-23, 1958, The Mystery was shown at the ninth annual National Roadster Show in Oakland where it won the Custom Car D'Elegance award. Due to excellent craftsmanship, both the Mystery and Bill Carr's 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air, The Aztec, won the Custom Car D'Elegance that year.

The Mystery went through several changes and paint jobs. When it was shown at the National Roadster Show in February 1958 it was copper, orange and gold. A picture taken by Andy Southard in 1963 shows the car in white and red. Another picture from the 1960s shows the car with a red and silver paint job.

From Custom Rooder. View attachment 12633 View attachment 12634 View attachment 12635 View attachment 12636 View attachment 12637

DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT HAPPENED TO THIS OLD GIRL? WHO OWNS IT NOW????
 
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