FORD RACE CAR'S

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FORD RACE CAR'S
« on: November 27, 2012, 11:09:29 PM »
I'LL START WITH A BIG WIN FOR FORD.
Something Chevy has never done.Win the 24 Hrs of Le Mans.
From Wikipedia.
The 1967 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 35th Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on 10 and 11 June 1967. It was also the seventh round of the World Sportscar Championship.

The Ford GT40 Mark IV was an updated version of the Ford J-Car, which was shelved following the fatal accident of Ken Miles in August 1966. The Mark IV had an all new chassis designed and built in the United States, as opposed to the Mark Is and IIs which had chassis that were built in England. The big-block 427 cubic inch (7 liters) Ford Galaxie-derived engine from the Mk.II was used for the Mk.IV. Although it had the same engine they did, the Mark IV had a low-drag body which increased the top speed of the car to nearly 220 mph.

The 1967 World Sportscar Championship season started on a real low for Ford. Ferrari had dominated the first round, a 24-hour race at Daytona International Speedway in the United States by finishing 1-2-3 (all works cars) while all of the works GT40 Mk.IIB’s (the Mk.IV was not ready yet, and the Mk.II’s were upgraded to “B” spec) effectively retired with the same type of gearbox troubles. Thoroughly humiliated on home soil, Carroll Shelby, the Holman & Moody squad and Ford executives knew what had to be done. They ended up winning the next round 6 weeks later at the 12 Hours of Sebring, also in the United States with their new Mk.IV with American Mario Andretti and New Zealander Bruce McLaren driving, run by Holman & Moody. Ford only entered the 12 and 24 hour races that were part of the championship; the way Ford saw it, Daytona and Sebring were really test runs for the only race that really mattered: the world stage at Le Mans.

The surprise winners were Americans A. J. Foyt and Dan Gurney, who led all but the first 90 minutes of the race and defeated the factory Ferrari 330P4 of Italian Ludovico Scarfiotti and Briton Michael Parkes by nearly four laps. The team had to fabricate a roof “bubble” to accommodate the helmet of Dan Gurney, who stood more than 190 cm (6 feet, 3 inches) tall. In one famous incident which took place in the middle of the night, Gurney had been running quite easily to preserve his car, and Parkes came up behind in the second-place Ferrari (which was trailing by four laps, or 34 miles). For several miles Parkes hounded the Ford driver by flashing his passing lights in Gurney’s mirrors until an exasperated Gurney simply pulled off the course at Arnage corner and stopped on a grassy verge. Parkes stopped behind him, and the two race-leading cars sat there in the dark, motionless, until Parkes finally realized this attempt at provocation was not going to work. After a few moments, he pulled around Gurney and resumed the race, with Gurney following shortly. With the cat-and-mouse game abandoned, each car then simply maintained their positions to the finish. The win remains, to this day, the sole all-American victory at Le Mans: an American-built car, prepared by an American team and driven by American drivers.

When the winners mounted the victory stand, Gurney was handed the traditional magnum of champagne. Looking down, he saw Ford CEO Henry Ford II, team owner Carroll Shelby, their wives, and several journalists who had predicted disaster for the high-profile duo of Gurney and Foyt. Many of the journalists had predicted the two drivers, who were heated competitors in the United States, would break their car in intramural rivalry. Instead, both drivers took special care to drive the car with discipline and won easily. On the victory stand, Gurney shook the bottle and sprayed everyone nearby, establishing a tradition reenacted in victory celebrations the world over ever since. Gurney, incidentally, autographed and gave the bottle of champagne to a Life Magazine photographer, Flip Schulke, who used it as a lamp for many years. Schulke recently returned the bottle to Gurney, who keeps it at his home in California.
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 12:21:36 AM »
Mustang GTP
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 12:22:31 AM »
THE MAN !
For us Ford guy’s he will always be the man.
As drag racing’s winningest driver until Funny Car star John Force eclipsed his career total of 85 wins in 2000, it shouldn’t be surprising that Bob Glidden is also the most successful racer to have competed at the NHRA U.S. Nationals with nine Pro Stock titles and a trio of wins in what was then known as the Mr. Gasket Pro Stock Challenge.

Indianapolis was in fact the site of Glidden’s first NHRA national event triumph, in 1973, proving that his runner-up finish to Bill Jenkins in his first Pro Stock race, the 1972 Supernationals, was no fluke. Glidden went on to score U.S. Nationals wins in 1974, 1978, and 1979 and really hit his stride in the 1980s, when, during his prime, he won in 1983 before reeling off four consecutive triumphs at the prestigious event from 1985 to 1988. Beginning in 1977, Glidden made it to an impressive 13 straight Indy finals. He fell in the 1989 Pro Stock final to Larry Morgan, ending his consecutive-wins streak.

In his career, Glidden won more events at NHRA’s season closer in Pomona, 11, and had duplicated his Indy total of nine at NHRA’s event in Columbus, but the lifetime resident of Whiteland, Ind., is best known for his U.S. Nationals triumphs.

When asked why he enjoyed so much success at the prestigious event, Glidden struck a very modest position. “It was the track that was closest to home, so we did a lot of testing there,” he said. “But other than that, I really can’t think of any other reason why we were so lucky.

“And we were lucky at that race,” Glidden continued. “I made a lot of mistakes while competing there. But we were on a roll during those years, and when that happens, it sometimes forces the other teams to make errors. It’s a lot like what’s going on with Greg Anderson now. There have been some races this year where he could have been beaten, but no one has taken advantage of it. When you’re on top of your game, you create your own good luck.”

Some have speculated that Glidden’s success is due partly to the location of his shop. “Someone pointed out recently that the fact that we did all of our dyno testing in the local weather conditions may have given us an edge. I had never really thought about that before, but that could have something to do with it. I guess you could say that it was our advantage to have our shop in Indiana than in [a high-altitude location such as] Denver, for instance.”

Glidden declined to say that he tried harder at the U.S. Nationals than at other events despite the obvious factor of hometown incentive. He said, “I can’t say that would be right because every race for us was like the U.S. Nationals.”

Despite his three victories in the Pro Stock Challenge, Glidden didn’t dominate that race-within-a-race like he did in Monday’s event eliminations. “I screwed up a lot at those [Challenge] events, mostly with bad driving. I don’t know why it happened, but that’s just the way it was. I made just about every possible mistake you could make in driving. Maybe that’s why we always did better on Monday — we got the mistakes out of our system on Sunday — but I can’t say for sure.”
A thoroughly focused racer during his driving days, Glidden never let emotions interfere with his race mode; consequently, he doesn’t have a favorite among his nine triumphs. “I really can’t think of any that were better than the others. My first win at the U.S. Nationals was big at the time because it was my first national event victory. But then every win after that was the best one. The win I would think of in that way now would be my last career win, in Denver [1995].”

Of his streak being broken by Morgan in the 1989 U.S. Nationals final, Glidden said, “I don’t remember much about the particular circumstances of that race, but was it a race that I felt I should have won? Hell yes. At that point in my career, things were going so good for us that we were in the position to win every race we competed in.”

Glidden made it to an impressive 13 straight Indy finals.

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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2013, 12:23:02 AM »
SHELBY'S SUPER SNAKE
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2013, 12:24:06 AM »
CSX 2026 Cobra Roadster
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2013, 12:24:42 AM »
Dave Macdonald 1964 Shelby Daytona Cobra
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2013, 12:25:23 AM »
Bob Allen in his Shelby Cobra 289 as it ran in the US National Races 1969
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2013, 12:26:21 AM »
WHEN THEY LOOK LIKE STOCK CARS.
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2013, 12:26:57 AM »
Glidden's Old T Bolt
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2013, 12:27:22 AM »
GAS
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2013, 12:27:57 AM »
BIRD AT DAYTONA
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2013, 12:29:56 AM »
1972 PANTERA
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2013, 12:33:38 AM »
Bob Hoshiko's Bird Now Owned by Dave Simard
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2013, 12:38:46 AM »
John Vogler's GR350  BUILT BY GRIGGS RACING
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2013, 12:41:05 AM »
WIND TUNNEL
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Re: FORD RACE CAR'S
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2013, 10:56:51 PM »
1964 SHELBY DAYTONA COUPE'S
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