GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2015, 10:13:21 PM »
1958 & 59 AMBR WINNER RICHARD PETERS ALA KART.
 
FROM Kustomrama Wikipedia
1929 Ford Midel A Pickup restyled by Barris Kustoms for Richard Peters of Fresno, California. Built expressly to win the America’s Most Beautiful Roadster Trophy at Oakland Roadster Show, George Barris began the construction on Richard’s flathead powered pickup truck in 1957. Peters had raced his flatbed truck on the dirt roads around the central California farming community before he decided that it was time to make it faster and nicer. Ironically, the truck actually won the AMBR prize twice, first in 1958 and then again in 1959.
The back body section was taken from a 1927 Ford Model T Roadster. The bed was completely hand formed and fitted with handmade trim. The bed had a tonneau cover which was upholstered with rolled and pleated Naugahyde matching the interior. The taillights are a combination of 1958 Chevrolet Impala and 1956 DeSoto bezels and lenses. The hood is a three piece unit with a continuous scoop made of Reynolds aluminum. The grille shell is made of hand formed metal and tubing and houses the quad lights are from a 1957 Imperial. Aside from the hood, all body work was done in 20 gauge cold rolled steel.
The engine is a fuel injected Dodge Red Ram hemi with the Dupree chrome dome double electric fuel pump, Hunt Magneto, Isky cam, Jahns Racing pistons and Ansen rods. The rear end is from a late model Ford complete with hydraulic brakes. The emergency brake is electrically operated by switch mounted on the dash. The suspension system is all made up of 4 coil springs with adjustable air bags. Torsion bars are Traction Masters with stabilizers. The transmission is a Lincoln Zephyr unit with 3.43 rear gears. The steering wheel was taken from a Lincoln Continental and the complete dash is hand formed with S-W dials. Wheels are chrome reversed units with spun bullets and Dunlop tires.
The top is all made of steel bows and covered with black Naugahyde. The interior has split wrap-around, semi-circle seats done in white pearl Naugahyde and black velvet with chrome beading between each pleat. Carpets are Mouton Black fur. The interior was done by George’s in-house upholsterer Roy Gilbert. The electrical system is 12 volt Autolite. Underneath, the flooring and pans are upholstered to match interior.
All four fenders have been bobbed and v-pointed and completely finished on the underside the same as the top. Nerf bars and the exhaust system are chrome plated with ripple side pipes fitted on the shortened running boards. The Kart was finished off with forty coats of white diamond dust mother-of-pearl with projection scallops in Kandy Cerise and gold leaf with pin striping, all hand rubbed to to a high luster. The scallops and paint were laid by George Barris himself, while Dean Jeffries did the pinstriping. The prep and some of the masking was done by Hershel “Junior” Conway.
While George did the wild body and paint, Richard Peters and Blackie Gejeian built and chromed the chassis back in Fresno.During the build, on December 7, 1957 the Barris Shop caught fire, and fourteen cars were lost to the blaze. The Ala Kart was in a separate room, and was luckily spared from the fire. With the Oakland Roadster Show only a couple of months away, things were now in a real hurry. In order to get the interior finished Peters ended up buying Roy Gilbert new stitching equipment.
The car was shown at the ninth annual National Roadster Show, held February 15-23, 1958. Being advertised as a $15,000 hand-built pickup, Richard won the grand award, a $5,000 nine-foot gold trophy being judged as America’s Most Beautiful Roadster of 1958. The car was displayed on a filted elevation with mirrors reflecting the chrome under-carriage and white Naugahyde under-flooring.
In 1960, Peters father demanded him to sell the car so he could focus on the family’s agri-business. Barris had by then made an agreement with AMT to make a model of the car, without involving Peters. In order to rectify the deal, Peters ended up selling the car to AMT for promotional purposes.
The Ala Kart is known for being the first Show Rod that turned into a model car kit. AMT bought the Ala Kart in 1961 and the model kit was released late that year. The Ala Kart model kit sold more than 1 million kits the following year.
In order to make the car more driveable in and out of shows, the Hilborn injectors were swapped for four Stromberg 97 carburetors. In November of 1963, while the Ala-Kart was being driven by AMT’s Budd Anderson, an electrical wire shorted out and melted the plastic fuel lines which allowed gasoline from the electric fuel pump to set the engine compartment ablaze doing serious damage to the hood and leaded cowl. The February 1964 issue of Rod & Custom reported the story in an article titled “The End of the Ala-Kart”. For the next year, the winner of 2 AMBR awards and over 200 other top trophies was stored in a Detroit garage. After receiving many letters from Ala-Kart fans, AMT sent the Ala-Kart back to Barris’ North Hollywood shop for restoration, coinciding with a re-release of the kit, which was chronicled in the September through November 1965 issues of Rod & Custom. At that time Rod & Custom proclaimed it “America’s most popular Hot Rod.” In 1966 the Ala Kart was sent to a new project shop they had set up in Phoenix, Arizona. Gene Winfield was hired by AMT in order to work on their 1:1 show cars in this shop.
In 1966, AMT sold the Ala Kart to Goodyear Tire dealer Jack Shira. Jack painted his logo on the doors, and displayed the Ala Kart in the lot of his store in the hoot Phoenix sun. After a few years Jack’s shop was closed, and the car disappeared. The car changed hands several times without any major changes being made to it. Nick Vaccaro was able to track the car down and acquire the famous Ala Kart. In 1973 Vaccaro ran an ad on the back of Hot Rod Magazine offering the car for sale. Vaccaro had disassembled the Kart and stripped most of its body. He had also began to make a new chassis for the car, with a TCI frame, smallblock Chevy engine and Jaguar rear end. Nick Vacarro owned the car at until 1996.
In 1996 a restoration of the car began at the Hershel “Junior” Conway House of Color. In the fall of 2001 John Mumford acquired the Ala Kart, and brought it to Roy Brizio’s shop for a full restoration.

MORE INFO HERE.http://hotrodcraft.com/index.php?topic=117.0
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2015, 04:02:25 PM »
1960 AMBR WINNER CHUCK KRIKORIAN’S “THE EMPEROR”. The Emperor
Written by Eric Geisert

So how do stories about emperors go? Oh yeah, “Once upon a time.” Well, alrightey then. . .Once upon a time in the fertile, grape-growing region of California’s Great Central Valley, in the kingdom of Fresno, there lived a high school student with a dream. And even though he wasn’t old enough to drive, young Chuck Krikorian wanted to have his very own hot rod. To this end he procured a ‘31 Model A frame and ‘29 roadster body, and set to work. He Z’d and boxed the frame, then channeled the body a full 8 inches (a trick that in itself was more of an East Coast thing) until he came up with just the right altitude—the end goal being one fast street and strip rod. He was even building a 406-cid ‘57 Cadillac mill to facilitate his dream of conquering the quarter-mile at Kingdon Dragstrip. Then, as luck would have it, two local Fresno rodders, Blackie Gejeian and Richard Peters (the latter of which just happened to be married to Chuck’s sister), dropped by to check on the roadster’s progress. Together these two seasoned veterans of hot rodding, themselves but young men, talked Chuck into building a showcar instead of a drag racer, their reasoning being that owning and maintaining a drag car would be much more expensive than displaying at shows. And Blackie should know, as he had already won the AMBR in ‘55, and Richard was underway with a ‘29 roadster pickup that would become known as the Ala Kart, winning both the ‘58 AND ‘59 title of America’s Most Beautiful Roadster. The car, which Chuck christened the Emperor (for the type of grape that is harvested last in the season), took some four long years to build, but was ready in time for the 1960 Grand National Roadster Show, a.k.a. Oakland. Now as brother-in-law Richard had won for the last two years, he graciously pulled the Ala Kart from competition so that Chuck could have a shot at the gold, even though the two were displayed side-by-side. This poses an interesting scenario though: would the Ala Kart have won three years in a row? It’s doubtful, but we (and Chuck) will never know for sure. Nonetheless, it does make for interesting speculation.

When Chuck had done all he could do to the car, including modifying the front and rear crossmembers to bolt-ins, and fabricating a new transmission crossmember for the Zephyrs-geared ‘48 Ford trans equipped with an Ansen Posi-Shift kit (floor shift conversion), he disassembled everything, including the 3.78:1-cogged Halibrand quick-change rearend (complete with torque tube driveline and un-split wishbone) and trucked it all over to California Chrome Co. in his hometown of Fresno. A side-note is that the chroming done over 40 years ago is still in great shape—a tribute to a time when craftsmen took great pride in their work. Chuck also finished building the Cad motor; installing a Chet Herbert cam, pushrods, and lifters; Jahns pistons (making for a compression ratio of 12.50:1); and a Vertex magneto. He also installed a sextet of Stromberg 97 carbs for both looks and performance.

With both chrome work and engine building finished, Chuck then assembled the chassis, mounted the body and, following in his brother-in-law’s footsteps (when he did the Ala Kart), made it down to Lynwood, California, putting his handiwork in the capable hands of George Barris (who, in a recent conversation, recalled committing his ideas into drawings from which Chuck chose a design). And even though we have different classifications in today’s hobby, there is no doubt that both the Ala Kart and Emperor were customized rods (okay—”Kustomized”)—what else could one call them?

The car seen here is pretty much time-vault authentic with a couple of exceptions, which might be considered as modern concessions. Blackie Gejeian is not only a good friend of the original owner, but has been the caretaker of the car for some 30 years now. Blackie also knows how to restore a hot rod to era-perfect condition, down to the last refurbished, original nut-and-bolt, as witnessed by his ‘55 AMBR-winning Shish Kebab Special that was reintroduced to the public at the 50th Anniversary Grand National Roadster Show (where it was displayed with other of Blackie’s automotive treasures, including the Emperor). All but a handful thought the Special had perished back in ‘56 when Blackie’s Speed Shop went up in flames, but thanks to the tireless efforts of both Blackie and Chuck (yes, the very same Chuck) who handled body and paint, the car exists exactly as it did that fateful evening early in ‘55 when it won the big 9-foot trophy. So, any non-original touches on the Emperor do have a rhyme and a reason—after all, it IS Blackie’s car.

Going over the car today, there are some obvious differences than when it won Oakland. For starters (and reasons known only to Chuck), the original wheels and tires were sold when he put the car in storage back in the ‘60s, where it remained for years, wrapped in blankets, with WD-40 down the barrels to keep the engine from freezing up. According to Blackie, the cycle fenders were so heavy from their leaded fins that they would both vibrate and snap mounting brackets, so they were never re-installed. But never fear, as Blackie has them safely sequestered away. At the time, wide chrome rims and raised white-letter blackwalls were the rage, so they were installed to give the jaunty little roadster a more contemporary flair. And even though they too are now dated, Blackie reports they provide a smooth ride and great handling.

The chrome (which constitutes a fair share of the car’s surface area, mostly underneath) is all original and, as stated, in remarkably good shape, with the headers deeply blued as evidence that the car not only runs, but runs well. Well enough, one might add, to have done 106 mph in the quarter-mile at the old Kingdon Dragstrip with Blackie at the wheel. He set the record for Street Roadster Class that day, even though he also “broke” the motor. And this happened shortly after the win at Oakland, too.

The interior is original as well, still sporting its taut pleats and with all its buttons in place, stitched there so many years ago by Eddie Martinez. However, it was upgraded soon after the big win with carpeted kick panels, lending the cockpit a more fitted look. This fact was only discovered after comparing 1960 photos with Eric’s recent photography.

The last item of note to ponder is the paint itself. As shown at Oakland, the roadster sported a wide, Tommy the Greek beltline stripe, with horizontal teardrop flourishes on the door tops. This was unusual in itself, for even though outlined teardrops were the Greeks’ signature, they were always applied on an angle. Anyway, the additional paintwork must have been applied when the car arrived in the Bay Area, because Oakland was Tommy the Greek’s home turf. Back then, many pinstripers, including Von Dutch, would ply their trade during the running of a show, amazing onlookers with their craft. The Greek striping is now missing—when and how did it go? In conversations with both Blackie and George Barris, the mystery of the missing striping is remembered differently. George believes the stripes were removed when the car was rubbed and buffed to bring back the original paint’s luster. Blackie remembers a faulty master cylinder as the culprit, getting brake fluid on the body from the firewall back, then having George repaint it in the original color, with the nosepiece left unscathed.

For whatever the irregularities in memory of just exactly what happened and when, one thing is for sure: the Emperor still looks great in his old clothes, belying some 41-plus years as a show ‘n’ go hot rod roadster. Long live the Emperor.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2015, 04:10:33 PM »
1960 AMBR WINNER CHUCK KRIKORIAN’S “THE EMPEROR”.
It's to bad it's not wearing the same wheels & tires & fenders.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2015, 04:41:44 PM »
1961 AMBR WINNER RICH GUASCO’S 1929 ROADSTER.
Written by Greg Sharp.

It would be difficult to find someone more associated with roadsters than Rich Guasco. The old joke suggests that the perfect girlfriend for a teenager has a father who owns a chrome shop and a mother who runs a liquor store. Guasco came close: His dad owned the Santa Rita Garage, a wrecking yard in the then-rural east San Francisco Bay community of Pleasanton. A family friend named Al Stanton (whose uncle had sold the yard to Rich’s father) drove in one day in his ‘29 highboy roadster. Barely a teenager, Guasco was mesmerized, recognizing a real hot rod from similar cars he’d seen in magazines left in junked cars. Stanton told Guasco it had a ‘32 Ford frame. Young Rich knew of lots of those in the back of the property. He promptly tipped a nice five-window coupe on its side and cut off the body and fenders. No big deal; it was just another 20-year-old junker with a stock flathead. He bolted on a ‘29 roadster body and drove it around. Rich was only 13, but Pleasanton was still rural, and he knew all the cops.

By 1957, he had installed a hot flathead, a dropped axle, and red-and-white tuck-’n’-roll upholstery, and painted the car light metallic-blue. It was stylish enough to make the March ‘58 cover of a long-forgotten East Coast monthly called Speed Mechanics. It was lucky to have survived to that point, as was its young owner. During one of Rich’s prelicensed joy rides, his dad caught sight of the roadster blasting around the family home. Simultaneously, Guasco realized he had no brakes and barely squeezed between the house and another building. Dad demanded that he take it back to the wrecking yard and cut it up. He complied, sort of: Rich took it apart, but stashed the pieces all over the yard. After Dad and the dust settled, he gradually put them back together.

Besides driving the car throughout high school and racing it at Kingdon Drag Strip (he held the Valley Timing Association A/Street Roadster record at 102 mph), he showed it often and, by studying his judging sheets, steadily improved its appearance. Oakland is just over the hill from Pleasanton, and that city’s perennial America’s Most Beautiful Roadster trophy is hot rodding’s Holy Grail. In 1960, Guasco tore his rod down for yet more improvements, eying the AMBR prize. However, he was drafted before the ‘61 Grand National Roadster Show and didn’t have a chance to put it back together. While Rich served in Germany, Al Stanton and his brother, Leroy, assembled the car and set it up in the show, with Mrs. Guasco’s blessing. Thus was the 81⁄2-foot trophy accepted by a hot rodder’s mom, who proudly sent a telegram informing the soldier that he now owned America’s Most Beautiful Roadster.

The following year, Rich was back in the States to enter both the roadster and his blown-Chevy dragster. The slingshot’s slick Jack Hagemann body and pearl-orchid paint helped earn the trophy for America’s Most Beautiful Competition Car. Guasco remains the only person in the 64-year history of the Grand National Show to win both top awards.

Rich drove ever-faster gas and fuel dragsters at northern California strips through January 13, 1963, when he suffered a near-fatal accident at Fremont Dragstrip. Approaching the finish line at full speed, his trick, all-aluminum rearend shook loose from its aluminum brackets and spun between his legs. Severe injuries left him in hospitals for most of the next two years and have necessitated countless surgeries since (continuing to this day). While recovering, Rich traded the repaired dragster for an American Bantam fuel roadster that Pete Ogden was building. Guasco made the first few runs himself, but hated having to be lifted into and out of the seat. The end to a promising career came the morning that his mom—”who’d never read a sports section in her life”—happened to catch his name in a local paper “and went ballistic,” Rich recalled. “Because my folks were paying all of my hospital bills, I had to agree to quit driving.”

Friends took turns behind the wheel, but, typical of fuel altereds, the roadster was a handful. Ogden said, “Guass, that thing is pure hell—you ought to name it that.” Thus was one of the most famous and feared names in drag-racing history born. The car really came to life around 1965, after Hall of Famer Dale Emery took the wheel and set e.t. and/or mph records at every strip they ran. In the five years that Dale the Snail drove, Rich recalls being beaten only twice in class competition. (Incredibly, Guasco continued to campaign the original Pure Hell in occasional match races and exhibitions through 1992, when NHRA’s Steve Gibbs persuaded him to replace the 30-year-old pipe.)

Rich’s subsequent Pure Hell Funny Cars and a tuning career with Raymond Beadle’s Blue Max and Dan Pastorini’s Top Fueler notwithstanding, the constant was always the Model A he’d owned since the eighth grade. Rich drove it occasionally, but it was showing its age by the ‘80s. The purple paint (originally a dye) had faded until most of the silver basecoat was showing. The pearl upholstery had gone away and been dyed brown. A set of Cragar five-spoke wheels replaced the aged, chrome-reversed originals. When anticipation began building for the ‘99 50th Grand National Roadster Show and its gathering of past AMBR winners, Rich got excited about rebuilding. In a few short weeks, the cracked frame was repaired, new running gear was installed, and the body was painted bright candy-purple by Rich Valdez (Creative Images; Lodi, California). Since the rebuild, it’s been across the country twice and has racked up at least 60,000 miles. It hasn’t been babied along the way, either. Rich entered Rod & Custom’s Asphalt Ego-Rama in 2005 and was the acceleration champ, turning 12.01 seconds at 113.48 mph. The roadster was second-best in braking and tied for First in style points.

Many car builders today struggle to capture a look or an era that they never knew. Rich Guasco hasn’t had to, because he and his hot rod have been inseparable for more than six decades.
Guasco showed his car often and paid attention to the judging sheets. This shot is from the ’59 Oakland Roadster Show. Prior to political correctness, painter Joe Ortiz called this color Mexican Red (actually candy apple), set off by red-and-white upholstery. The flathead had been replaced by a 301ci Chevy (based on the stock 283 that mysteriously disappeared from the very first V8 Chevy that came into the family wrecking yard) with three twos and homebuilt headers. Chrome-reversed wheels have been constants in this hot rod’s long life.

You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2015, 04:50:19 PM »
1961 AMBR WINNER RICH GUASCO’S 1929 ROADSTER.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2015, 05:00:19 PM »
1962 AMBR WINNER GEORGE BARRIS 1927 T ROADSTER
From Street Rodder.
George Barris is thought of as a custom car builder, and indeed he is, but he’s always built hot rods as well—albeit with his special custom touch. As the story goes, George and his older brother Sam’s first automotive efforts were put towards a ‘25 Buick sedan, which they started working on before legal driving age. The dented body was banged out, bolt-on accessories were added, and the jointly owned car was painted by brush with orange and blue stripes. It was a retina-vibrating color combination to say the least, but the boys must have done something right, as it found a buyer. The proceeds of the sale were used to purchase and doll-up a ‘29 Model A Ford. The car was “customized” to the max (George hadn’t come up with the “K” word yet). It had Auburn exhaust stacks sticking through the hoodsides and, as George puts it in the book he and David Fetherston collaborated on, Barris Kustoms of the 1950s, “A slew of accessories from the local hardware store, including aerials, lights, and a mass of hood ornaments.” George relates that his first real hot rod was a Deuce highboy roadster, but ever the tinkerer, he replaced the stock windshield with the curved backlite from a later-model sedan, setting it on a rakish angle. One might wonder, “Curved windshields for hot rods 60-some years ago?” And you thought this was a recent development.

After the Barris brothers moved to Southern California from the Sacramento area (George moved first, then Sam joined him in 1945 after his discharge from the service), they opened their first honest-to-goodness shop in the city of Bell. Shortly thereafter they relocated to 7674 Compton Ave. in Los Angeles. Here, George continued to “customize” hot rods when he wasn’t working with Sam on customers’ cars. And the name of their shop? Barris’s Custom Shop, with a Body & Fender Works tag line (no “K” word yet). It was here that George built a low, full-fendered ‘29 Model A roadster with a Deuce shell. The unique thing about the car is its molded-in V’d windshield. The roadster was used for everything from basic transportation, to street, circle track, and lakes racing. There’s a great photo taken behind the Compton Ave. address in Kustoms that shows three ‘29 A roadsters parked in a row one Sunday morning in preparation for a trip to Corona Speedway. One is channeled, with the license plate inset into the rear panel and ‘39 Ford taillights added—you know, all the things one might still do today. Another sits atop Deuce rails, and the third is, of course, George’s personal car, the roadster. It’s interesting to note that the other two have V’d windshields as well.

But enough of ancient history—let’s get closer to today by moving the hands of our clock to 1959. By now, George was heavily involved in show biz rods and customs (and yes, custom was finally spelled with a “K” as it had been for several years), providing cars for movie and television productions (see Barris TV and Movie Cars by George Barris and David Fetherston). George kept busy not only with his customers (mostly car-crazed kids of Southern California’s youth culture—should I have used all “Ks” here?), but by building and renting cars to studios as well (witness the “Batmobile,” and countless others). One such car, a traditional ‘27 T roadster on Deuce rails, was George’s personal hot rod, which appeared on the Robert Young TV series, Window on Main Street. The biggest challenge was to simulate its crashing into a tree with a stunt man behind the wheel—OUCH!

George’s efforts with Richard Peters’ “Ala Kart” had earned back-to-back AMBR awards (America’s Most Beautiful Roadster) at the Grand National Roadster Show in 1958 and 1959, and 1960 brought an AMBR award for Chuck Kikorian’s ‘29 Model A roadster “Emperor” (Milestones, Mar. ‘01). This was all great stuff, but George had never scored the 9-foot AMBR trophy with a car of his own—a situation that would soon be rectified. As he already owned a TV star car, you can guess what happened next. George had the basic car, but there was a lot to do if it was to go for the gold at Oakland, so the doll-up phase began. As George was also heavily involved in photography and writing for Petersen Publishing at the time, many steps of the roadster’s transformation were documented on film, and seen on the pages of Rod & Custom, as well as Petersen’s Spotlite Series (little 25-cent technical publications). In fact, the T was used as a demo car for Metalflake painting in the ‘62 Spotlite Book, Custom Painting Techniques, authored by George Barris, where it is shown being sprayed Peacock Metalflake Green.

As its paint job was most likely the single item that had most to do with its ‘62 Oakland win, it stands to be briefly mentioned for historical reference. Metalflake was first introduced to rodders at the opening of the “Swingin’ Sixties” with Hot Rod magazine’s February ‘61 cover story. The trick was reflective paint additive (the creation of Dobeckmum, a division of Dow Chemical), which was used to paint three vehicles for the article, one of which was Dick Scritchfield’s Deuce highboy roadster (yes, the McGee roadster—see Milestones, March ‘02 for coverage of the restored car). Scritch’s rodney was painted red in a matter of speaking, by first laying down silver ‘flake, then applying a red-tinted topcoat-much as candy apple red would be applied over a silver or gold base. By this time, however, George was an old hand at applying Metalflake, having sprayed pearls and candies over a ‘flake base on his “XPAC 400” air car, which he showed at the ‘61 Grand National Roadster Show that January. This was the year previous to his win with the “Twister T.”

The Twister T was the cover car for the Petersen Spotlite Book titled Custom Upholstering, which George authored as well. Here, he showed many examples of stitchwork, having Lee Wells (who worked out of Barris Kustom City in North Hollywood) stitch the T’s door panels in Pearl White and Metalflake Green Naugahyde. Another Spotlite Book, Custom Hot Rods, showed how the expanded metal and horizontal aluminum grille insert for the car’s filled Deuce shell was formed and also how to make those nutty ripple shock covers. The January ‘63 issue of R&C had a tech story on making plywood and foam seats and headrests with a mount created from a bicycle handlebar. Later in August of 1963, R&C would conduct a road test on the roadster as well. (Editor’s Note: We realize that there are many more articles on the car we didn’t research.) In the aforementioned road test I found that George’s Sixtyized hot rod would do the standing quarter-mile at 80 mph in 17 seconds flat with its quad-carbed 270-cid Dodge Red Ram Hemi V-8. Ford hydraulic binders brought it to a stop in 202 feet during the standard 60-0-mph brake test.

Tracking the history of the Twister T was relatively simple compared to many cars with its ownership lineage. George sold the car right after winning the AMBR award in 1962-63 to Buddy Parrozo who brought the car to his home in Portland, Oregon. Buddy showed the car in 1963-64 at both Portland and Seattle area car shows before he sold it.

Here the lineage becomes a bit murky, but we know that a Ford auto dealership owner by the name of Francis Ford bought the car, circa-1966, from a used car lot that was located on 82nd Boulevard in Portland. He turned the car over to his son who quickly made some modifications, which included painting the interior black. It was in this state that Clyde Rollins of Portland, Oregon, found the car in 1968.

Clyde eventually turned the car over to his son, Bobby Rollins. Bobby is the current-day owner and, between he and his dad, has owned the car since 1968—Bobby has no intentions of ever selling the car. Bobby and Dick Dean get the credit for the fine restoration bringing the Twister T back to its former glory. (For the record, Dick worked on the car in its Barris days.) In speaking with Bobby, he tells us that while the fenders are painted, they really need to be chromed and the edges need to be repainted to be representative of their original look.

It was a real thrill to see the car again at the 50th Anniversary of the Grand National Roadster Show, held at San Francisco’s Cow Palace in 1999. I was honored to be selected as an AMBR judge at this auspicious event by the late Don Tognotti, just as I had the previous year. In this capacity I looked at the Twister T in a new light, wondering how my vote would have gone if I’d had the same prestigious assignment almost four decades earlier. Would I have cast my vote for the car? Yep—I do believe I would have, but this is coming from a guy who also had a Metalflaked car in 1961—a Peacock Blue ‘48 Ford ragtop, with a pearl white Naugahyde interior yet! So, in conclusion, the staff hopes you’ve enjoyed seeing this 40-year-old “Oakland Roadster Show” winner in STREET RODDER as much as we’ve enjoyed bringing it to you.

You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2015, 06:48:12 PM »
1963 AMBR WINNER LeROI TEX SMITH XR 6
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2015, 06:53:54 PM »
1963 AMBR WINNER LeROI TEX SMITH XR 6
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2015, 06:56:53 PM »
1963 AMBR WINNER LeROI TEX SMITH XR 6
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2015, 07:00:14 PM »
1963 AMBR WINNER LeROI TEX SMITH XR 6
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2015, 01:28:32 PM »
Saw Crackbon's 25 sitting at Sanderson headers shop.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2015, 01:30:17 PM »
2 more.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

Tom

  • Administrator
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2015, 03:09:57 PM »
It's amazing to me that so many of the previous winners are still around.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2015, 04:08:48 PM »
1964 AMBR WINNER DON TOGNOTTI''S KING 'T'.
1964 AMBR award winner, the famous King T designed and built by Don Tognotti and Gene Winfield represents the 60's like no other roadster. Began in July of '62 and finished in '64, the King T has been restored with exacting standards to the original. The custom tubular frame with independent rear suspension and '51 coil springs for the front have been fully restored to the original over the top chrome presentation. The original engine, fully rebuilt and dynoed, features gleaming metal flake paint. Presented in its prime for the show circuit with Hilborn injectors, the King T is currently fitted with a Carter AFB 500 carburetor. Hydro-matic transmission shifts with linkage run through the spark and advance controls on the steering column. Interior features the period pleated and button tufted design, along with the original chest seen in display materials. Original rims re-created to duplicate the wood spoke look favored by Tognotti. Painted in Wild Pearl Lavender by Gene Winfield in 1963, Gene was asked to re-create the original paint. In 2007, Winfield flew to Seattle and painted and remembered times with the King T. Full photo documentation. The King T is famous for wild styling and over the top chroming. Also sold as a model known as Tognotti's T the Grand Sweepstakes winner at Winter Nationals Auto Fair and the Oakland Roadster Show became famous later as Hot Heaps, the Hot Wheels version of Don Tognotti's dream.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2015, 04:18:34 PM »
DON TOGNOTTI''S KING T COVER OF ROD & CUTOM JUNE 1964.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW -HISTORY & AMBR WINNER'S
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2015, 04:23:14 PM »
1964 AMBR WINNER DON TOGNOTTI''S KING 'T'.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.