Tether cars

Tether cars
« on: February 01, 2014, 10:58:57 AM »
Peerless
Want to buy.......some round, skinny, bias ply tires.

Re: Tether cars
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2014, 11:00:52 AM »
Roadrunner
Want to buy.......some round, skinny, bias ply tires.

Re: Tether cars
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2014, 11:19:29 AM »
Bremer Whirlwind
Want to buy.......some round, skinny, bias ply tires.

Re: Tether cars
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2014, 11:26:45 AM »
Another whirlwind
Want to buy.......some round, skinny, bias ply tires.

Tom

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2014, 04:45:22 PM »
Those are cool !  Thanks.

flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2014, 09:27:06 PM »
1940s Roadrunner by Don Edmunds
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2014, 09:28:43 PM »
Vintage
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2014, 09:30:28 PM »
1948 'Scat Cat' Tether Car. McCoy .19 Engine
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2014, 09:31:46 PM »
English Streamliner Salt Flats Goldie Gardner MG Record Car
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2014, 09:32:39 PM »
Eric Zausner with three of his cars.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2014, 09:33:41 PM »
Highly tuned engines and aerodynamic bodies make the cars capable of reaching actual (not scale) speeds of more than 200 MPH.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2014, 09:35:35 PM »
This young man’s doing it the hard way. He has his battery hooked up, but he’s turning the rear wheel by hand to get the engine to turn over.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2014, 09:36:49 PM »
Thunderbolt  one of only two known to exist.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2014, 09:38:07 PM »
Vintage
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2014, 09:39:28 PM »
Ad
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2014, 09:40:29 PM »
Curley Class B Mite Racer Model
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2014, 09:41:23 PM »
Challenger Very Rare.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2014, 09:42:35 PM »
Willard Battery Special Agajanian Indy Car.
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flatheadv8s

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2014, 09:45:16 PM »
Vintage
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Striper

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2014, 11:24:30 PM »
All of these are beautiful , but I'm particularly impressed by the lettering on the #98 car  !
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2014, 09:11:17 AM »
Bantam.
Want to buy.......some round, skinny, bias ply tires.

TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2014, 09:13:38 PM »
Bunch Speed Demon Model
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2014, 09:14:28 PM »
Here, he’s holding a front-wheel-drive car, and there’s a rubber wheel on the engine that he’s holding the car against until the car turns to life
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2014, 09:17:34 PM »
Here he’s working on the frog. Note the spare tires in the toolbox deeper in the trunk
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2014, 09:19:09 PM »
The broom handle was an alternative method of bump starting a car
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2014, 09:19:57 PM »
VINTAGE
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lurker mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #26 on: May 03, 2014, 12:35:19 AM »
I have several mite size cars (Rodzy's, Thimbledrome's, etc.) but I just bought my first "big" car off e-bay a couple months ago.

Its a McCoy Hot Rod with a .60 engine. Trying to decide whether to repaint it or not.

Wish I could afford more of these but they are getting out of my price range.

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2014, 03:38:38 PM »
I have several mite size cars (Rodzy's, Thimbledrome's, etc.) but I just bought my first "big" car off e-bay a couple months ago.

Its a McCoy Hot Rod with a .60 engine. Trying to decide whether to repaint it or not.

Wish I could afford more of these but they are getting out of my price range.

Mick
COOL MICK.
 LEAVE AS IS.
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2014, 04:32:22 PM »
A FEW
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #29 on: September 19, 2014, 04:33:47 PM »
THEY CRASH,JUST LIKE THE BIG RACER'S DO
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #30 on: September 19, 2014, 04:38:35 PM »
VINTAGE
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2015, 12:10:15 PM »
 Tether Car.
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #32 on: December 07, 2015, 12:22:47 PM »
Final tether car Elton Winchell (of Fairabend Engineering fame) built.  The car was designed and completed by him in 1951.  He was the fastest qualifier at Atlanta, GA in August, 1953 at 145.12mph.  The pan is magnesium and was designed by Elton.  The body is hand carved mahogany.  Engine is a Dooling .61 with magneto. Before Elton died at 92, he had three tether cars left.  The earliest one was sold to a collector for $10,000.  He left the second one to Jim Ogden (of Fairabend Engineering fame) and the last and final car was left to Dale Martell, Jr.  (Dale Martell, Sr. was also from Fairabend Engineering).
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DavyJ

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2015, 08:27:03 PM »


you tube.........vintage tether cars
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DavyJ

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2015, 08:34:50 PM »
another

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lurker mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #35 on: December 08, 2015, 05:20:15 PM »
I've added a few more large cars to my collection. A Gary Barnes built racer I bought at the 2014 Hershey swap meet. This is from the late 90's, fiberglass body on an aluminum pan, powered by a McCoy .60 engine, complete and ready to run.

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #36 on: December 08, 2015, 05:40:10 PM »
This is a 1942 Hiller Comet. The Comet was manufactured by Stanley Hiller Jr. who started Hiller Industries when he was just a teen, he designed a die-casting machine to make the .61 c.i. engine.

Using his high school buddies to build the racers on an assembly line he designed and built,
at age 17 his company was making $100,000 a year. Pretty good for the very early 40's.

He later went on to build the Hiller helicopters and airplane parts. Very interesting man!

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #37 on: December 13, 2015, 07:48:06 PM »
This is a 1942 Hiller Comet. The Comet was manufactured by Stanley Hiller Jr. who started Hiller Industries when he was just a teen, he designed a die-casting machine to make the .61 c.i. engine.

Using his high school buddies to build the racers on an assembly line he designed and built,
at age 17 his company was making $100,000 a year. Pretty good for the very early 40's.

He later went on to build the Hiller helicopters and airplane parts. Very interesting man!

Mick
Very cool Mick.I guess you will be needing this soon for power.
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2015, 12:06:14 AM »
That is definitely a cool fuel bottle. Tether car racers were the first to use nitromethane as a fuel.

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2016, 07:44:34 PM »
That is definitely a cool fuel bottle. Tether car racers were the first to use nitromethane as a fuel.

Mick
Did not know that.Thanks.
 Here's some Thimble Drome Fuel.
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #40 on: January 29, 2016, 07:47:49 PM »
Cox Thimble Drome Champion
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #41 on: July 14, 2016, 04:31:15 PM »
I just finished a cosmetic restoration of this Dooling Arrow. It's complete and ready to run. I did the paint, polishing & fellow club member Bruno Perry did the lettering.

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #42 on: July 14, 2016, 04:43:38 PM »
I also acquired a couple of Mite size cars lately. The Orange Martin Flash is powered by a McCoy .29 engine and is also lettered by Bruno Perry.

The white scalloped Hornet Mite is believed to be a Dick McCoy 1970's recast powered by an original Hornet.19 engine, and is set up for rail racing.

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2016, 09:40:29 PM »
The white car by the guy’s knee is the Rexner, which was a front wheel drive car.
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lurker mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #44 on: October 01, 2016, 05:21:41 PM »
Great photo Beppie, probably taken mid to late 40's. You are correct in the identification of the Rexner front drive car and hopefully I think I can I.D. the others.

The 2 cars to the far left are Dooling Mercury's rear drive, with a Dooling Mercury front drive on the immediate left of the Rexner. Two Dooling mercury front drives to the right of the Rexner. These are all Class B racers - .361 - .625 c. i. (large bore motors)

The two class A racers - .000 - .360 c. i. (small bore motors) are both Peerless rear drive cars.

That's your useless information for the day but it was free!

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #45 on: October 01, 2016, 07:31:44 PM »
Great photo Beppie, probably taken mid to late 40's. You are correct in the identification of the Rexner front drive car and hopefully I think I can I.D. the others.

The 2 cars to the far left are Dooling Mercury's rear drive, with a Dooling Mercury front drive on the immediate left of the Rexner. Two Dooling mercury front drives to the right of the Rexner. These are all Class B racers - .361 - .625 c. i. (large bore motors)

The two class A racers - .000 - .360 c. i. (small bore motors) are both Peerless rear drive cars.

That's your useless information for the day but it was free!

Mick
It's never useless to me.Maybe someday I'll pick one up.I'am sure it won't be at this price.
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #46 on: October 01, 2016, 10:08:55 PM »
If they were still this price I'd take a bunch. What do you suppose these 1940 prices would be today?

Mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #47 on: October 02, 2016, 12:06:29 AM »
If they were still this price I'd take a bunch. What do you suppose these 1940 prices would be today?

Mick
Well this DOOLING Yellow #5 Mercury  is 4,700.
DOOLING BROTHERS
RACING CARS
3433 WEST 59TH STREET
AND
5452 WEST ADAMS BOULEVARD
LOS ANGELES  16, CALIF

Dooling. Anyone interested in miniature gas-powered race cars is familiar with the name. Possibly the most famous and successful of all model race car manufacturers, the Dooling brothers not only mass-produced seven different race cars of their own design, but also developed and marketed one of the finest high-performance miniature racing engines: the Dooling .61.
Tom, Russell, and Harris Dooling began building racers in 1937 for their own pleasure. These early crude, buggy-type creations, powered by model airplane motors, nurtured what would become a thriving business beginning in 1939.

The Doolings' first car, the Mercury Midget, also known as the First Series Front Drive, was produced in 1939. As the nickname implies, the car was a front drive model with cast aluminum frame, grill, and axles. The body was formed of sheet stock with a wood center-section running the length of the tail. The car was over nineteen inches long. Price was $19.50. This car had the distinction of being the first of the trio of Mercury series cars. The name "Mercury" was taken from the ancient, fleet-footed Roman god—a fitting reference to the first three Dooling products.
18.
The second car, the Mercury Deluxe, more commonly known as the Rear Drive, was produced in late 1939. A favorite of collectors, this car had a two-piece cast aluminum body, grille, and frame. Hood and belly pan were formed of sheet aluminum. Four coil springs mounted on each corner of the frame provided suspension. True to its nickname, the car was rear-driven with bevel gears in a cast aluminum housing. On the gear-case cover was embossed "Dooling Bros, Mercury, Los Angeles." Priced at $23.50 less engine, the car measured eighteen inches long.
The last of the Mercury series of cars was produced in the fall of 1940 and was known as the Front Drive, or Second Series Front Drive to collectors. The body was a one-piece aluminum casting with a separate enclosed cast motor mount/drive unit. Underneath, a shallow, gently curved sheet aluminum belly pan covered the internal workings. The hood was also formed of sheet aluminum.
Again, the gear-case cover carried the embossed words, "Dooling Bros, Mercury, Los Angeles." The cast aluminum rear axle floated on a spring through-bolted to the body, and a V-shaped cast bracket provided the nose of the unit with additional support and alignment. Price was $27.50 less engine.
In factory polish or custom-painted finishes with a polished grille, it was a beautiful car.
Dooling introduced the Streamliner in 1939. Because of the car's overall appearance and squat stature, it was affectionately nicknamed the "Frog" by enthusiasts. The car was driven by a horizontally mounted engine with spur gears. The entire motor mount assembly, including the drive-axle, could be lifted out of the car by removing just four screws located beneath the belly pan. The cast aluminum body separated to reveal a two-piece front axle. By virtue of a torsion bar system, each spring-loaded front wheel assembly could be adjusted for ride height and varying track conditions. Both axles were locked down by hexagon nuts after adjustment. Dooling Brothers offered a rare option called a Speedkit in June 1941. The kit consisted of an extra set of drive wheels and two extra spur gears. These gears and wheels, along with the ones supplied with the car, combined to make up six different drive ratios. A high-compression head for a Super Cyclone engine and a special formula fuel were also part of the kit. The Frog measured sixteen inches, nose to tail.
In late 1940 the Dooling brothers produced the Pee Wee, a twelve inch long racer designed for the medium class (cars with engine sizes .36 to .45 cubic inches). With a polished, two-piece cast aluminum body and direct drive off the engine crankshaft to the left-rear wheel, the Pee Wee was potent and simple. Advertisements of the era proclaimed that these cars, with Bunch engines, could run seventy-plus miles per hour. A little cousin to the Second Series Front Drive, the Pee Wee was priced at $16.45 less engine.
After the war, in April 1946, the Dooling brothers produced the "F" car. Probably the easiest Dooling car to find, the "F" car is sixteen inches long with a two-piece die-cast magnesium body. I Once again bevel gears were used to drive the rear axle. A separate, stamped aluminum Kurtis midget-type grille was riveted to the body top. Front axles were of two-piece cast aluminum knee-action design, supported by a bracket bolted to the belly pan. Rubber grommets surrounding the axles provided more support at the body openings. Cars from the factory came painted in many combinations of colors. Optional tires and a front axle could be had for rail racing. Price of the "F" car was $45, flywheel and universal included, but less engine.
There has been some speculation concerning the "F" designation. What does it mean? As of this writing, no one knows for sure. Could the letter "F," sixth in the alphabetand the sixth car in Dooling production, be coincidental? One interesting suggestion, from a Dooling descendant, stems from the fact that all three Dooling brothers had the same middle name—Fowler. Hence, the "F" nomenclature. Again, this is only speculation.
Another "F" car did, in fact, exist—a limited-production predecessor to the common magnesium car. This car looked similar to the later version but was different in many ways. An aluminum body with noticeable changes in cowl and belly pan and the lack of a cast-in seat set this car apart. These aluminum "F" cars are very rare today.
The last of the mass-produced Dooling cars, the Arrow, hit the market in April 1948. The Arrow was the fastest of all Dooling designs. When equipped with Dooling's own .61 engine, the Arrow was a racing force to be reckoned with. Body design consisted of a lightweight fiberglass body and an aluminum belly pan. The Arrow could be purchased race-ready from the factory, complete with the Dooling .61 engine, fuel tank, coil, shut-off, and batteries for $125.
Considering the Doolings' longevity in the model race car business, the number of cars they produced was large in comparison to other makes, although exact production figures are not known. The magnesium "F" car is the easiest to find today. The Arrow and the Mercury Deluxe (or Rear Drive) turn up occasionally. The rest of the Dooling cars are even rarer.


Volumes could be written about the Dooling brothers' accomplishments, their cars, and their engines. Some enthusiasts, in fact, concentrate on assembling Dooling-only collections. The Dooling brothers' facet of the miniature race car hobby alone would be a considerable investment of time and money— and satisfaction.— by Jerry Brown
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #48 on: December 01, 2016, 06:50:52 PM »
# 98
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #49 on: December 01, 2016, 06:52:18 PM »
A few.
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #50 on: December 01, 2016, 06:53:12 PM »
Speed King
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #51 on: December 01, 2016, 06:56:16 PM »
Halibrand (Indy Car) Style Machined Aluminum Wheels & Tires.
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lurker mick

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #52 on: December 22, 2016, 10:32:31 PM »
I just finished polishing and cleaning up this 1947 A. L. Maxey Challenger Jr.

This is a mite size car approx 11" long. The Maxey is unique because of the choice of an "Air-O-Diesel" .278 c. i. engine, powering the Left front wheel.

Diesel engines in tether cars were common in Europe but quite rare in the U. S. A.

Mick

 

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #53 on: May 06, 2017, 12:05:05 PM »
Hein Hobby Shop
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #54 on: May 06, 2017, 12:10:21 PM »
A few Ads.
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TS3X65MPH

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #55 on: May 06, 2017, 12:12:45 PM »
Superspeed Midget Racer
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #56 on: May 06, 2017, 12:13:40 PM »
How to build a miniature tether race car like the diesel powered Indy 500 racer.
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Thirty2ragtop

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #57 on: May 06, 2017, 03:54:36 PM »
Great Stuff!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #58 on: March 31, 2018, 09:19:56 PM »
Tether Car
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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #59 on: April 01, 2018, 12:46:38 AM »
Here's my newest, bought from the late Lloyd Torrey collection. It's a Papina P-3 powered by an OK Super 60 converted to glow plug ignition. It is 17 1/2" long and has a Magnesium pan with a plastic body.

This car was raced almost entirely in Sweden, the S.M.R.U. standing for the Swedish Model Racer Union.

The Papina tether/rail cars were originally built in 1948/1949 by Al Papina in San Francisco, Al was a noted midget race car builder and driver in northern California in the 40's.

This car is complete and ready to run.

Mick   

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Re: Tether cars
« Reply #60 on: April 01, 2018, 07:24:41 AM »
It looks like new!  That is an awesome find, Mick!