Vintage Motorcycles

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #240 on: August 09, 2017, 08:13:14 PM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

jaded iconoclast

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #241 on: August 09, 2017, 08:54:35 PM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
I have a '73 Ducati 750gt, not as much rep, but a much more user-friendly bike, and I really love bevel drive ducatis. The Vincent is cool, but really, it's not something you can feel comfortable parking somewhere and going about your business. $75000/$100k that can easily be wheeled into the back of a van, and poof, it's in a shipping container to Russia or China an hour later. I just couldn't see myself riding it anywhere except shows, the fun of that would wear off pretty fast.

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #242 on: August 09, 2017, 10:10:36 PM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
I have a '73 Ducati 750gt, not as much rep, but a much more user-friendly bike, and I really love bevel drive ducatis. The Vincent is cool, but really, it's not something you can feel comfortable parking somewhere and going about your business. $75000/$100k that can easily be wheeled into the back of a van, and poof, it's in a shipping container to Russia or China an hour later. I just couldn't see myself riding it anywhere except shows, the fun of that would wear off pretty fast.

The Ducati is a much more user friendly bike.  ;)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

jaded iconoclast

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #243 on: August 09, 2017, 10:26:59 PM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
I have a '73 Ducati 750gt, not as much rep, but a much more user-friendly bike, and I really love bevel drive ducatis. The Vincent is cool, but really, it's not something you can feel comfortable parking somewhere and going about your business. $75000/$100k that can easily be wheeled into the back of a van, and poof, it's in a shipping container to Russia or China an hour later. I just couldn't see myself riding it anywhere except shows, the fun of that would wear off pretty fast.

The Ducati is a much more user friendly bike.  ;)
Honestly it has much more intrinsic value than the Vincent, and god, that engine! I liken the bevel drive Ducati engine to if Harry Miller had built a v-twin motorcycle engine. It's just beautiful, beautiful to look at, beautiful to listen to, beautiful to work on, beautiful to be around, it's just friggin art.
My brother kept the Triumph Daytona, and dad had a half finished Suzuki twin cafe racer that I will probably finish off eventually, I think if he were watching, that would make him smile. Theres also a disassembled Japan market Honda NSR250R there that I might put back together. I have been riding my brother-in-laws little 125 Yamaha around town here a little bit, and I kind of forgot just how much fun a real light, small cc bike can be just for ripping around on. I think I might try to put the NSR back together, but form what I hear, bottom end parts are real hard to get, so I don't know, when I start really digging in to it, I might find it's just not practical.

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #244 on: August 10, 2017, 12:49:03 AM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
I have a '73 Ducati 750gt, not as much rep, but a much more user-friendly bike, and I really love bevel drive ducatis. The Vincent is cool, but really, it's not something you can feel comfortable parking somewhere and going about your business. $75000/$100k that can easily be wheeled into the back of a van, and poof, it's in a shipping container to Russia or China an hour later. I just couldn't see myself riding it anywhere except shows, the fun of that would wear off pretty fast.

The Ducati is a much more user friendly bike.  ;)
Honestly it has much more intrinsic value than the Vincent, and god, that engine! I liken the bevel drive Ducati engine to if Harry Miller had built a v-twin motorcycle engine. It's just beautiful, beautiful to look at, beautiful to listen to, beautiful to work on, beautiful to be around, it's just friggin art.
My brother kept the Triumph Daytona, and dad had a half finished Suzuki twin cafe racer that I will probably finish off eventually, I think if he were watching, that would make him smile. Theres also a disassembled Japan market Honda NSR250R there that I might put back together. I have been riding my brother-in-laws little 125 Yamaha around town here a little bit, and I kind of forgot just how much fun a real light, small cc bike can be just for ripping around on. I think I might try to put the NSR back together, but form what I hear, bottom end parts are real hard to get, so I don't know, when I start really digging in to it, I might find it's just not practical.
They are fun! I often wish I had bought the Triumph Daytona, instead of telling your Dad about it, what a great find that was. Now get back to your vacation before the wife figures out how much you've been on here! ;)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

jaded iconoclast

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #245 on: August 10, 2017, 05:12:38 AM »
Pure mechanical beauty.  One of the members here has one of these, that we will probably see one day.  ;) 8) ::)
Had, I sold it. :o I will try to round up some old pics though.
Thought you might, It really wasn't what you are into, despite the cool factor of owning one.
I have a '73 Ducati 750gt, not as much rep, but a much more user-friendly bike, and I really love bevel drive ducatis. The Vincent is cool, but really, it's not something you can feel comfortable parking somewhere and going about your business. $75000/$100k that can easily be wheeled into the back of a van, and poof, it's in a shipping container to Russia or China an hour later. I just couldn't see myself riding it anywhere except shows, the fun of that would wear off pretty fast.

The Ducati is a much more user friendly bike.  ;)
Honestly it has much more intrinsic value than the Vincent, and god, that engine! I liken the bevel drive Ducati engine to if Harry Miller had built a v-twin motorcycle engine. It's just beautiful, beautiful to look at, beautiful to listen to, beautiful to work on, beautiful to be around, it's just friggin art.
My brother kept the Triumph Daytona, and dad had a half finished Suzuki twin cafe racer that I will probably finish off eventually, I think if he were watching, that would make him smile. Theres also a disassembled Japan market Honda NSR250R there that I might put back together. I have been riding my brother-in-laws little 125 Yamaha around town here a little bit, and I kind of forgot just how much fun a real light, small cc bike can be just for ripping around on. I think I might try to put the NSR back together, but form what I hear, bottom end parts are real hard to get, so I don't know, when I start really digging in to it, I might find it's just not practical.
They are fun! I often wish I had bought the Triumph Daytona, instead of telling your Dad about it, what a great find that was. Now get back to your vacation before the wife figures out how much you've been on here! ;)
You know that Daytona really was a hell of a score and the '70 is the best year. It was in really nice shape under all the rattle can flat black. I sanded it with 1200 grit all the original purple and silver were under there, my brother will be able to get a good colour match. It's a nice bike, really in pretty good shape under all the mess.

jaded iconoclast

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #246 on: August 10, 2017, 06:35:47 AM »
Does this style make the cut ?
Is that Tom McMullen on the right?

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #247 on: August 15, 2017, 11:54:56 PM »
 ;) 8)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #248 on: September 16, 2017, 10:49:34 AM »
Pancho Villa and his Indian Motorcycle.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #249 on: September 16, 2017, 10:53:03 AM »
Indian Fire Response bike.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #250 on: September 16, 2017, 12:47:45 PM »
 ;) 8) ::)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #251 on: September 16, 2017, 12:55:31 PM »
Bill Harley  ;)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #252 on: September 16, 2017, 01:08:49 PM »
Not sure what's going on here! :o
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #253 on: September 16, 2017, 05:46:01 PM »
 ;)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #254 on: September 16, 2017, 06:50:51 PM »
Paul Jorgensen, Exelsior 1000, 1921
 






Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

  • Hero Member
Re: Vintage Motorcycles
« Reply #255 on: September 16, 2017, 06:54:58 PM »

Frank Varey at work on the cinder tracks of the late 1920s. Love his evil getup - I’m pretty sure he was the model for that iconic speedway rider closeup photo. El Diablo Rojo. Bike is a #Rudge speedway.
 








Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark