Street Scenes

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #352 on: December 24, 2017, 02:06:12 PM »
Birks-Ellis-Ryrie Jewelers, Toronto, Ont. 1934.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #353 on: December 24, 2017, 02:08:29 PM »
City of Toronto, year unknown.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #354 on: January 01, 2018, 11:14:01 PM »
Nice 29 Chevrolet roadster. ;D
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #355 on: January 02, 2018, 02:24:29 PM »
 :D :D SE 13th and East Powell St., Vancouver. 1929 Chev.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #356 on: January 02, 2018, 07:35:50 PM »
 8) 8) :)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #357 on: January 03, 2018, 02:09:10 PM »
 8)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #358 on: January 03, 2018, 02:27:05 PM »
This is such an interesting photo.  ;)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #359 on: January 03, 2018, 02:47:57 PM »
I never realized that there were any of these built as a street car. 8)
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #360 on: January 08, 2018, 06:41:08 PM »
 ;) :)
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Tom

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #361 on: January 08, 2018, 10:02:23 PM »
 :)

TS3X65MPH

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #362 on: January 08, 2018, 10:14:28 PM »
I never realized that there were any of these built as a street car. 8)
In 1963, Chevrolet created three fastback Novas for road race competition. The Novas were all convertibles pulled from the regular production line. They were then shipped to the Corvette plant for the addition of fiberglass parts. The doors, inner panels, front fenders, hood and both front and rear bumpers were all 'glass. The new roof and fastback was also made of fiberglass and bonded to the metal. The fastback covered what would have been the trunk lid and blocked all access to the trunk area from the outside.

After a 1963 Corvette independent rear suspension was also added, the cars were shipped to Bill Thomas in California. Chevrolet also shipped the "Mystery Motors", that later ended up with Smokey Yunick, to Bill to be installed in the Novas. Bills job was to install the engines and setup the suspension for road racing. Before the Novas could be completed, GM put a ban on all factory racing.

GM ordered the cars crushed but Bill worked out a deal to keep the cars as payment for his work. The engines were sent back to Chevrolet and then to Smokey Yunick in Florida. He then sold one Nova to Fritz Callier, a Chevrolet dealer in Dallas,to be drag raced. Another one was sold to a Los Angeles Chevrolet dealer who drag raced it for less than two months before crashing it and totally destroying it. The third was sold to Alan Green Chevrolet in Seattle.

Alan Green also drag raced the Nova with driver Dick Milner and crew chief Tom Foster. Green, Milner and Foster raced the Nova at drag strips throughout the northwest United States and western Canada from 1963 until 1967. During one race the fastback roof blew off at 155 mph. The team then ventilated the rear section to keep the car from wanting to fly above 150 mph.

 These fastback Novas sport a roofline similar to, but predating, that of the Plymouth Barracuda, AMC Marlin, 1966 Dodge Charger and about half of the late-1960's-era Fords. Fastbacks were popular with buyers in the later 60's, but aerodynamic efficiency on the race track was the main concern of Chevrolet engineers. Ironically, even though they were built to be road raced, all three of the fastback Novas spent almost their entire racing lives on the drag strip.
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Fordors

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #363 on: January 08, 2018, 10:39:08 PM »
I never realized that there were any of these built as a street car. 8)
In 1963, Chevrolet created three fastback Novas for road race competition. The Novas were all convertibles pulled from the regular production line. They were then shipped to the Corvette plant for the addition of fiberglass parts. The doors, inner panels, front fenders, hood and both front and rear bumpers were all 'glass. The new roof and fastback was also made of fiberglass and bonded to the metal. The fastback covered what would have been the trunk lid and blocked all access to the trunk area from the outside.

After a 1963 Corvette independent rear suspension was also added, the cars were shipped to Bill Thomas in California. Chevrolet also shipped the "Mystery Motors", that later ended up with Smokey Yunick, to Bill to be installed in the Novas. Bills job was to install the engines and setup the suspension for road racing. Before the Novas could be completed, GM put a ban on all factory racing.

GM ordered the cars crushed but Bill worked out a deal to keep the cars as payment for his work. The engines were sent back to Chevrolet and then to Smokey Yunick in Florida. He then sold one Nova to Fritz Callier, a Chevrolet dealer in Dallas,to be drag raced. Another one was sold to a Los Angeles Chevrolet dealer who drag raced it for less than two months before crashing it and totally destroying it. The third was sold to Alan Green Chevrolet in Seattle.

Alan Green also drag raced the Nova with driver Dick Milner and crew chief Tom Foster. Green, Milner and Foster raced the Nova at drag strips throughout the northwest United States and western Canada from 1963 until 1967. During one race the fastback roof blew off at 155 mph. The team then ventilated the rear section to keep the car from wanting to fly above 150 mph.

 These fastback Novas sport a roofline similar to, but predating, that of the Plymouth Barracuda, AMC Marlin, 1966 Dodge Charger and about half of the late-1960's-era Fords. Fastbacks were popular with buyers in the later 60's, but aerodynamic efficiency on the race track was the main concern of Chevrolet engineers. Ironically, even though they were built to be road raced, all three of the fastback Novas spent almost their entire racing lives on the drag strip.

Thanks for those details Beppie, that fills in some blanks. I always thought the body modifications were done in the Bill Thomas shops. I did know about the Corvette rear ends and I think that points to the cars being built for the Daytona Speed Weeks like the 421 Tempest coupes that ran there in ‘63.
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Tom

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #364 on: January 09, 2018, 04:43:38 PM »
Bob's

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #365 on: January 15, 2018, 05:45:38 PM »
1938 Peoria, IL
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

29bowtie

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #366 on: January 15, 2018, 06:03:42 PM »
Dickey Prairie covered bridge, Molalla River, near Molalla, Oregon, ca. 1942.
Professionals built the Titanic, An Amateur built the Ark

TS3X65MPH

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Re: Street Scenes
« Reply #367 on: January 16, 2018, 01:06:00 AM »
Baltimore 1953
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.