TOMMY IVO'S TWIN

TS3X65MPH

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TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« on: September 19, 2015, 01:12:03 AM »
COVER OF CAR CRAFT SEPT 1960.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

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  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2015, 01:25:45 AM »
More.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2015, 01:30:42 AM »
More.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

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  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2015, 01:36:10 AM »
More.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

TS3X65MPH

  • Hero Member
  • THANKS TO MY DAD & MOM,WIFE GLYNIS & SON STEVEN
Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2015, 01:39:41 AM »
More.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

DavyJ

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Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2015, 09:19:57 PM »
here are a few more pics,  I threw in the T bucket just for fun...................love that Hollywood windshield  8)
Living life at a 100 smiles per hour!

TS3X65MPH

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Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2017, 05:16:26 PM »
A few more.
You Aren't Living If Your Windshield Isn't Dirty.

DavyJ

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Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2017, 06:36:50 PM »
*Chartreuse is the new Green*

As with many other demographics, drag racers are a superstitious bunch. Some superstitions make sense. Some are a little more off-the-wall.

Tommy Ivo had a real problem with green cars. He was sure that they were bad luck. History has shown that he almost always tended towards red or burgundy cars, starting with his Buick, then his T bucket, and nearly every dragster or funny car he campaigned.

In 1964-65, he saw some really sharp dragster bodywork on another car, and commissioned a duplicate body for himself.

For some reason, he felt that the car looked the best in the colour shown…in an inch of metal flake.

Of course, if anyone suggested that this car was green, he would correct them adamantly. To this day, he maintains that this car was not green: rather it was “chartreuse”.


On a side note, Ivo always wanted his cars to present well, so he was always sure to chrome plate as many parts as he could, and when it came to the paint, he always wanted a maximum amount of metal flake to dazzle the spectators and competition. As a result, his body panels were always really heavy, due to all that flake. Don Garlits used to tease Tommy about the weight of his cars: calling them Euchlids. (Euchlid used to be a heavy machinery manufacturer)

Now you know.

Thanks for reading,

-Dan

(Sources: Tom Jobe, Tommy Ivo, Bill Pitts, Don Garlits)
Living life at a 100 smiles per hour!

DavyJ

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Re: TOMMY IVO'S TWIN
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2017, 07:06:49 PM »
another quote from Dan...
Slipping Clutches and 7 Second runs (a tale from 1962)

By the early 1960’s, the real challenge in drag racing was the battle between horsepower and traction. If you were running nitro, or a supercharger, or a hemi, you were guaranteed to fry the little slicks that were available at the time. That is why those early drag racing movies and videos show tire smoke for the entire quarter mile. There just wasn’t enough tire available.

If you wanted to go faster, something was going to have to change.

Tommy Ivo is credited with the solution, by virtue of his first pass into the 7’s, but he readily admits that it was by mistake.

Dave Zeutchel was building his engines and helping him tune his top fuel car in 1962: a car known as The Barnstormer. As an experiment, Dave put a smaller 10 inch clutch in the car, in an effort to reduce the amount of reciprocating weight. He knew it was slip and burn up faster than their normal clutch, but it was worth a try. The real result was that the little clutch slipped during the entire run. They were surprised to find that the slipping clutch actually allowed the tires to keep up with the power of the hemi, and they went faster!

They kept their discovery a secret. They began slipping the clutch during the entire first half of the run manually; by simply pushing in the clutch pedal, and they began to dominate. It is by virtue of this method that Ivo was able to record the very first 7-second pass in history.

Here is an eyewitness account of that pass…

“I witnessed Tommy Ivo’s 7.99 at Pomono…Awesome! The first run in the 7-second zone! We were standing on the edge of the rtrack at around the 1000 foot mark. Very much a history making run in more way that one, and it was also probably the first “real” successful use of a slipping clutch in a fuel car (smokeless).

I remember the run vividly, because there were 3 of us standing there and we were betting each other on what would let loose first: the engine or the clutch. Ivo was slipping on a 2-disc set up.

We thought he had bogged at first, because there was no smoke off the line. Then the tires started to haze just a little and he was makin’ tracks. By the time he got to where we were, he was totally hooking up. You could feel the pwer in the bottoms of your feet. It went up through your legs, and came out your face.

Most impressive run I ever saw…or felt!!!

Of course, but the time this pass was made, Ivo’s competitors were becoming wise to the slipping clutch method. Keith Black knew what was going on; and he had actually experimented with putting the clutch in backwards to get it to slip automatically. Don Prudhomme recorded the second 7-second run two weeks later in the Greer/Black/Prudhomme slingshot, using the slipping clutch method.

To this day; even with the multi-disc clutch set ups and 8000-10,000hp that a modern fuel car makes, the challenge remains getting that power to the ground. Clutch slipping and the timing of the application of power is the essence of fuel racing to this day.

…and it all started with Dave Zeutchel’s 10” clutch experiment.

Now you know.

Thanks for reading.

-Dan

(sources: Fred Vosk, Tommy Ivo, Bill Pitts)
Living life at a 100 smiles per hour!